SEO Test Tool

This tool allows you to analyze the source code of a page
and verify the optimization for the search engines.

URL:



Respuesta: HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Date: Wed, 27 May 2020 05:24:30 GMT
Server: Apache
X-Powered-By: PHP/5.4.45-0+deb7u29
X-Drupal-Cache: MISS
X-Content-Type-Options: nosniff
X-Frame-Options: ALLOW-FROM https://canvas.ox.ac.uk
Content-Language: en
Link: ; rel="canonical",; rel="shortlink"
Cache-Control: public, max-age=1800
Vary: Cookie,Accept-Encoding,X-Forwarded-Proto
Last-Modified: Wed, 27 May 2020 05:24:28 GMT
Content-Type: text/html; charset=utf-8
X-Varnish: 1354334384
Age: 0
Via: 1.1 varnish
X-Cache: MISS
Connection: close
URL: http://www.ox.ac.uk/news/2019-10-09-irresistible-pull-–-when-massive-stars-collide
Charset: utf-8
Title: The irresistible pull – when massive stars collide | University of Oxford
Description: All neutron stars are magnetic, but some are more magnetic than others. The latter, so-called magnetars, are the strongest magnets in the Universe. How do these massive stars acquire their large magnetic field? A team of astrophysicists from Germany and the UK may now have solved the more than 70-year-old conundrum of the origin of strong magnetic fields in massive stars. 
Keywords:
Geo.region:
Geo.position:
Geo.placename:
Texto: The irresistible pull – when massive stars collide | University of Oxford Skip to main content Home Home Admissions Undergraduate Graduate Continuing education Research Divisions Research impact Libraries Innovation and Partnership Support for researchers Research in conversation Public Engagement with Research News & Events Events Science Blog Arts Blog Oxford and coronavirus News releases for journalists Filming in Oxford Find An Expert About Organisation Facts and figures Oxford people Oxford Access International Oxford Building Our Future Jobs 牛津大学 Search News & Events Events Regular events in the University Year Black History Month at Oxford Race and the Curriculum Women of Achievement Science Blog Arts Blog Oxford and coronavirus News releases for journalists Filming in Oxford Find An Expert A simulation marking the birth of a magnetic star such as Tau Scorpii. The image is a cut through the orbital plane where the colouring indicates the strength of the magnetic field and the hatching represents its field lines. Credit: Ohlmann/Schneider/Röpke Published 9 Oct 2019 Share This Tweet Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share on Reddit Home News The irresistible pull – when massive stars collide The irresistible pull – when massive stars collide Research All neutron stars are magnetic, but some are more magnetic than others. The latter, so-called magnetars, are the strongest magnets in the Universe. How do these massive stars acquire their large magnetic field? A team of astrophysicists from Germany and the UK may now have solved the more than 70-year-old conundrum of the origin of strong magnetic fields in massive stars.  ">Video of Stellar magnetism: When stars collide Published today in Nature , the scientists have shown how strong magnetic fields can be formed in stellar mergers by developing a model with large computer simulations. First author, Fabian Schneider, currently at Heidelberg University in Germany and previously a Hintze Fellow in Oxford’s Physics Department , said: ‘We know that the Sun has a turbulent envelope in which its magnetic field is continuously generated. But more massive stars do not have such an envelope. Still, about 10 percent have a strong, large-scale surface magnetic field whose origin has eluded us since their discovery in 1947.’ It is these stars that astronomers believe to form highly magnetic neutron stars when they explode in supernovae. Sebastian Ohlmann from the Max Planck Society in Garching, Germany, said: ‘Over a decade ago, it was suggested that strong magnetic fields might be produced when two stars collide, but up until now, we had not been able to test this hypothesis, because we did not have the necessary computational tools.’ In the study published today, the team utilised the novel AREPO code and ran it on computing clusters of the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS). They showed that a strong magnetic field is indeed produced thanks to the strong shear and the large turbulence present in the merger of two stars. Stellar mergers occur frequently, and it is thought that about 10 percent of all massive stars in the Milky Way are the products of stellar mergers – a good match with the occurrence rate of magnetic stars. When stars merge, they appear younger than they really are. This phenomenon is well known, and such stars are called blue stragglers. Philipp Podsiadlowski from the University of Oxford’s Department of Physics, said: ‘In 2016, we realised that the magnetic star Tau Scorpii (τ Sco) is a blue straggler and could show that, if τ Sco was a merger product, it would explain its anomalously young age. We then suggested that this star may also have obtained its strong magnetic field in the merger process and our new simulations demonstrate exactly this.’ At the end of its life, τ Sco will explode in a supernova when its core collapses and most probably leave behind a highly magnetized neutron star. Friedrich Röpke from HITS, said: ‘These magnetars are thought to have the strongest magnetic fields in the Universe – up to one hundred million times stronger than the strongest magnetic field ever produced by humans. Our simulations show that the generated magnetic field could be sufficient to explain the exceptionally strong magnetic fields inferred to exist in magnetars. It makes our model a promising channel to explain the origin of such extremely strong magnetic fields. It is great to see that this idea now seems to work out so beautifully.’ Read the full paper in Nature . Latest BBC Contagion experiment offers insights into Covid-19 control 26 May 2020 Oxford COVID-19 vaccine to begin phase II/III human trials 22 May 2020 Conspiracy beliefs reduce the following of government coronavirus guidance 22 May 2020 Oxford leads on UK trial sites testing potential COVID-19 preventatives 21 May 2020 COVID-19: Shifting attitudes to migration? 20 May 2020 All news Share This Tweet Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share on Reddit Connect with us iTunes Youtube Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Weibo Instagram Medium The Conversation Information About Oxford University Strategic plan Oxford's research Fees and funding Libraries Museums and collections Open days Oxford glossary Freedom of speech statement Statement on Modern Slavery Data privacy / GDPR Sport at Oxford Conferences at Oxford 牛津大学 Information For Prospective undergraduates Prospective graduate students Prospective Continuing Education students Prospective online/distance learning students Current Oxford students Current Oxford staff Oxford residents/Community Visitors/Tourists Media Alumni Teachers Parliamentarians Businesses/Partnerships Quick Links Contact search Jobs and vacancies Term dates Map Nexus365 email Giving to Oxford Oxford University Images © University of Oxford 2020 Contact us About this site Legal Privacy policy Cookie statement Accessibility Statement


Enlaces
1 #main-content
2 /
3 /
4 /admissions
5 /admissions/undergraduate
6 /admissions/graduate
7 /admissions/continuing-education
8 /research
9 /research/divisions
10 /research/research-impact
11 /research/libraries
12 /research/innovation-and-partnership
13 /research/support-researchers
14 /research/research-in-conversation
15 /research/public-engagement
16 /news-and-events
17 /events-list
18 /news/science-blog
19 /news/arts-blog
20 www.ox.ac.uk/coronavirus
21 /news-and-events/for-journalists
22 /news-and-events/filming-in-oxford
23 /news-and-events/find-an-expert
24 /about
25 /about/organisation
26 /about/facts-and-figures
27 /about/oxford-people
28 /about/oxford-access
29 /about/international-oxford
30 /about/building-our-future
31 www.jobs.ox.ac.uk/
32 /cn
33 /news-and-events
34 /events-list
35 /news-and-events/The-University-Year
36 /news-and-events/black-history-month
37 /news-and-events/race-and-curriculum
38 /news-and-events/women-of-achievement
39 /news/science-blog
40 /news/arts-blog
41 www.ox.ac.uk/coronavirus
42 /news-and-events/for-journalists
43 /news-and-events/filming-in-oxford
44 /news-and-events/find-an-expert
45 https://twitter.com/intent/tweet
46 https://www.facebook.com/sharer/sharer.php
47 https://www.linkedin.com/shareArticle?mini=true
48 //www.reddit.com/submit
49 /
50 /news
51 /news-listing?category=228
52 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1621-5
53 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1621-5
54 www2.physics.ox.ac.uk/research/astrophysics/oxford-centre-for-astrophysical-surveys
55 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1621-5
56 www.ox.ac.uk/feeds/rss/news?about-this-site=
57 www.ox.ac.uk/news/2020-05-26-bbc-contagion-experiment-offers-insights-covid-19-control
58 www.ox.ac.uk/news/2020-05-22-oxford-covid-19-vaccine-begin-phase-iiiii-human-trials
59 www.ox.ac.uk/news/2020-05-22-conspiracy-beliefs-reduces-following-government-coronavirus-guidance
60 www.ox.ac.uk/news/2020-05-21-oxford-leads-uk-trial-sites-testing-potential-covid-19-preventatives
61 www.ox.ac.uk/news/2020-05-20-covid-19-shifting-attitudes-migration
62 //www.ox.ac.uk/news-and-events
63 https://twitter.com/intent/tweet
64 https://www.facebook.com/sharer/sharer.php
65 https://www.linkedin.com/shareArticle?mini=true
66 //www.reddit.com/submit
67 //www.ox.ac.uk/itunes-u
68 http://www.youtube.com/oxford
69 https://www.facebook.com/the.university.of.oxford
70 https://twitter.com/uniofoxford
71 https://www.linkedin.com/company/4477?trk=prof-exp-company-name
72 http://e.weibo.com/OxfordUni
73 //www.ox.ac.uk/apps
74 http://instagram.com/oxford_uni
75 https://medium.com/oxford-university
76 http://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-oxford-1260
77 //www.ox.ac.uk/about/organisation
78 //www.ox.ac.uk/strategicplan
79 //www.ox.ac.uk/research
80 //www.ox.ac.uk/node/1783/
81 //www.ox.ac.uk/research/libraries
82 //www.ox.ac.uk/visitors/visiting-oxford/visiting-museums-libraries-places
83 //www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/visiting-and-outreach/open-days
84 //www.ox.ac.uk/about/organisation/history/oxford-glossary
85 compliance.web.ox.ac.uk/freedom-of-speech
86 compliance.admin.ox.ac.uk/modern-slavery
87 //www.ox.ac.uk/about/organisation/governance/dataprivacy
88 www.sport.ox.ac.uk/
89 http://www.conference-oxford.com/index.php
90 //www.ox.ac.uk/cn
91 //www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate
92 //www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate
93 //www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/applying-to-oxford/for-international-students
94 //www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/continuing-education
95 //www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/continuing-education/online-and-distance-courses
96 //www.ox.ac.uk/students
97 staff.admin.ox.ac.uk/
98 //www.ox.ac.uk/local-community
99 //www.ox.ac.uk/visitors
100 //www.ox.ac.uk/news-and-events
101 www.alumni.ox.ac.uk/
102 //www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/open-days-and-visits
103 //www.ox.ac.uk/oxford-in-westminster
104 //www.ox.ac.uk/research/innovation-and-partnership
105 staff.admin.ox.ac.uk/
106 www.jobs.ox.ac.uk/
107 //www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-figures/dates-of-term
108 //www.ox.ac.uk/visitors/map
109 https://outlook.office.com/owa/
110 www.campaign.ox.ac.uk
111 http://www.oxforduniversityimages.com/
112 //www.ox.ac.uk/contact-us
113 //www.ox.ac.uk/about-this-site
114 //www.ox.ac.uk/legal
115 //www.ox.ac.uk/privacy-policy
116 //www.ox.ac.uk/content/cookie-statement
117 //www.ox.ac.uk/accessibility



Otras páginas de analisis SEO :   Woorank en español - Pages Inventory SEO tool - Seo book - Seo Site Checkup


Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional ¡CSS Válido!